Getting Started With WordPress Development

Last night I spoke at a meetup of the Cape Town PHP Group. I was speaking alongside the excellent Gareth McCumskey who was giving a run down of what we can expect in PHP 7 (we can expect a lot of awesomeness by the way – you should really check that out).

My presentation for the evening was a primer on WordPress development and a guide on how to bend WordPress to your will (which would have made a way more awesome title for the talk).

The vast majority of the 30 attendees at the meetup were advanced PHP developers who had minimal experience with WordPress development – this gave me a nice opening where I could talk about some of the basics of writing code for WordPress without having to start with the basics of PHP first. It was also relatively intimidating knowing that most of the people in the room were probably more experienced and more qualified developers than myself, but I think I held my own well enough.

My talk was well received and I think I went on for quite a bit longer than I was supposed to, but that was mainly due to so many questions being asked. It was very encouraging to see that there is clearly a significant interest in WordPress development inside the PHP community.

The video and slides for my talk are below, along with a list of useful links that I either mentioned or feature in my slides at some point.

Useful links:

WordPress plugin developer info
All the information you need in order to get your plugin on the WordPress plugin repository.
WordPress coding standards
WordPress has defined coding standards for PHP, Javascript, HTML and CSS.
WordPress Action Reference
An ordered list of (almost) all of the action hooks available in WordPress core.
WordPress Filter Reference
A list of (almost) all of the filters available in WordPress core.
My WordPress plugin template
A plugin template I developed for my own use that helps get a new plugin off the ground with very little effort.
Varying Vagrant Vagrants (VVV)
Varying Vagrant Vagrants is an evolving Vagrant configuration focused on WordPress development.

Whether you were at the meetup or not I would encourage you to dive head first into WordPress development and I’ll happily lend a hand where I can, so get in touch with me in the comments!
Ken (legend)

Software development never changes

In the early ’80s, my father trained countless Cobol programmers. A mantra that he always repeated to every single one of his students was this:

A good programmer focuses on getting the code right, while a great programmer focuses on what the users have asked for.

That was over 30 years ago. Around the time BASIC was invented – before C++, Turbo Pascal or Perl even existed and long before PHP, Python, Ruby, Javascript or any language that we actually use today had even been conceptualised.

Jump ahead to 2015.

This week I was interviewed on the WisdmLabs blog about my WordPress development practices. They asked me: What is the difference between a good developer and a great developer?

The answer was fairly obvious to me, not because my father had told me (I never knew he even had that mantra), but because this is just the way I have always viewed things:

A good developer focuses on code, while a great developer focuses on users.

So what’s changed in 30 years of software development?

Nothing.

Sure, we have new technologies available to make things easier – simpler languages, more convenient libraries, new coding standards and more efficient IDEs. But none of that will ever change what the main focus of any software development should always be: users.

If users aren’t at the centre of your development then you’re already doing it wrong.


I should probably point out that the guy in the photo at the top is not my dad – that’s Ken Bowler, a systems programmer from the University of British Columbia circa 1980.